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Monthly Archives: October 2012

Using the Internet Safely

These days just about everyone is using the Internet, however, it is important to remember some basics whilst surfing!  Over the years these are the rules I came up with for my classroom…

Netiquette– the basic rules of online etiquette

Stop Piracy!

  • Maintain a positive online presence:
  • Follow all school/corporate polices & Laws
    • No illegal activity
    • No uploading/downloading of:
      • inappropriate content
      • viruses
      • copyrighted materials without permission
    • Do not claim someone’s work as your own

  • Maintain your privacy!
  • Be aware of where you are. Read the description and note the site extension before clicking

Resources for more information:

Netiquette

Safe Teens

Plagiarism

Copyright Infringement

Credits:

Dowshen, S. (2011, June). Safe surfing tips for teens. Retrieved from http://kidshealth.org/teen/safety/safebasics

/internet_safety.html

Edwards, C (2010). Lydi_pirate [Image]. From personal photo library

Klintworth, P. (2008). Online safety [Image]. Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/27340884@N07/

2550811617

MCCCD legal services department – what students should know about copyright. (2008). Retrieved from http://

http://www.maricopa.edu/legal/ip/students.htm

MsStarlile (2011, April 30). Top 10 netiquette rules [Video]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=

FJncZc-80GQ&feature=youtu.be

Netsmartz. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.netsmartz.org/Teens

Ross, S. (2012, January 18). Albion. Retrieved from http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.htmlWhat is

plagiarism?. (2009, July 05). Retrieved from http://www.plagiarism.org/

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Using the Internet Safely

These days just about everyone is using the Internet, however, it is important to remember some basics whilst surfing!  Over the years these are the rules I came up with for my classroom…

Netiquette– the basic rules of online etiquette

Stop Piracy!

  • Maintain a positive online presence:

  • Follow all school/corporate polices & Laws

    • No illegal activity
    • No uploading/downloading of:

      • inappropriate content
      • viruses
      • copyrighted materials without permission

    • Do not claim someone’s work as your own

  • Maintain your privacy!

  • Be aware of where you are. Read the description and note the site extension before clicking

Resources for more information:

Netiquette

Safe Teens

Plagiarism

Copyright Infringement

Credits:

Dowshen, S. (2011, June). Safe surfing tips for teens. Retrieved from http://kidshealth.org/teen/safety/safebasics

/internet_safety.html

Edwards, C (2010). Lydi_pirate [Image]. From personal photo library

Klintworth, P. (2008). Online safety [Image]. Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/27340884@N07/

2550811617

MCCCD legal services department – what students should know about copyright. (2008). Retrieved from http://

http://www.maricopa.edu/legal/ip/students.htm

MsStarlile (2011, April 30). Top 10 netiquette rules [Video]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=

FJncZc-80GQ&feature=youtu.be

Netsmartz. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.netsmartz.org/Teens

Ross, S. (2012, January 18). Albion. Retrieved from http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.htmlWhat is

plagiarism?. (2009, July 05). Retrieved from http://www.plagiarism.org/

 

Social Networking & Walled Gardens

Walled Garden Voice Thread
Images:

Bliss, R. (2008). Filoli Gardens [Image]. Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/bliss1955/2439544161/sizes

/o/in/photostream/

Robertson, G. (2004). Fall in the high country –Marble mountains [Image]. Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/

photos/garytrinity/2364482396/sizes/o/in/photostream/

Szalwinski, B (2011). Square foot gardening [Image]. Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/bruceandsusan/

5598941954/sizes/o/in/photostream/

 
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Posted by on October 21, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Social Networking & Walled Gardens

Walled Garden Voice Thread
Images:

Bliss, R. (2008). Filoli Gardens [Image]. Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/bliss1955/2439544161/sizes

/o/in/photostream/

Robertson, G. (2004). Fall in the high country –Marble mountains [Image]. Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/

photos/garytrinity/2364482396/sizes/o/in/photostream/

Szalwinski, B (2011). Square foot gardening [Image]. Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/bruceandsusan/

5598941954/sizes/o/in/photostream/

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 21, 2012 in Ed Tech 541

 

Multimedia in the Classroom

This was a challenging project, namely because everything was very glitchy this week. After having several screencast apps crash, I ended up using Debut Video Capture. This program is very simple to use, and comes with a video editor that will allow a direct upload to YouTube.


References:

Antonenko, P. (2010). Using Electroencephalography to Measure Cognitive Load. Educational Psychology Review,

22(4), 425-438.

Beal, J. A. (2009). Human brain lateral view – Lobes [Image]. Retrieved October 13, 2012 from

Database Center for Life Science (2010). Four Lobes animation small [Image]. Retrieved October 13, 2012 from

Gerlic, I., & Jausovec, N. (1999). Multimedia: Differences in cognitive processes observed with EEG – ProQuest.

Educational Technology, Research and Development, 47(3), 5–14.

Information Processing Model [Image]. (2011). Retrieved October 13, 2012 from http://digitalsandbox.edublogs.org/

files/2007/11/information-processing-model.jpg

Hippocampus [image]. Retrieved from http://morphonix.com/software/education/science/brain/game/specimens/

hippocampus.html

McLaughlin, J. S., & Munsell, D. S. (2012). Evolving On-Line Pedagogy: Developing Research-Based Multimedia

Learning Tools for the High School and Undergraduate Biology “Classroom”. International Journal of Online

Pedagogy and Course Design (IJOPCD), 2(1), 1-20. doi:10.4018/ijopcd.2012010101

Neo, T. K., Neo, M., & Kwok, W. J. (2009). Engaging students in a multimedia cooperative learning environment:

A Malaysian experience. Same places, different spaces. Proceedings ascilite Auckland 2009. Retrieved from

http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/auckland09/procs/neo.pdf

Word cloud of student responses to “How did social networking tools contribute to learning?”. Retrieved from

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/social-networking-tools-facilitate-cross-program-collaboration

 
4 Comments

Posted by on October 14, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

Tags:

Multimedia in the Classroom

This was a challenging project, namely because everything was very glitchy this week. After having several screencast apps crash, I ended up using Debut Video Capture. This program is very simple to use, and comes with a video editor that will allow a direct upload to YouTube.


References:

Antonenko, P. (2010). Using Electroencephalography to Measure Cognitive Load. Educational Psychology Review,

22(4), 425-438.

Beal, J. A. (2009). Human brain lateral view – Lobes [Image]. Retrieved October 13, 2012 from

Database Center for Life Science (2010). Four Lobes animation small [Image]. Retrieved October 13, 2012 from

Gerlic, I., & Jausovec, N. (1999). Multimedia: Differences in cognitive processes observed with EEG – ProQuest.

Educational Technology, Research and Development, 47(3), 5–14.

Information Processing Model [Image]. (2011). Retrieved October 13, 2012 from http://digitalsandbox.edublogs.org/

files/2007/11/information-processing-model.jpg

Hippocampus [image]. Retrieved from http://morphonix.com/software/education/science/brain/game/specimens/

hippocampus.html

McLaughlin, J. S., & Munsell, D. S. (2012). Evolving On-Line Pedagogy: Developing Research-Based Multimedia

Learning Tools for the High School and Undergraduate Biology “Classroom”. International Journal of Online

Pedagogy and Course Design (IJOPCD), 2(1), 1-20. doi:10.4018/ijopcd.2012010101

Neo, T. K., Neo, M., & Kwok, W. J. (2009). Engaging students in a multimedia cooperative learning environment:

A Malaysian experience. Same places, different spaces. Proceedings ascilite Auckland 2009. Retrieved from

http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/auckland09/procs/neo.pdf

Word cloud of student responses to “How did social networking tools contribute to learning?”. Retrieved from

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/social-networking-tools-facilitate-cross-program-collaboration

 
4 Comments

Posted by on October 14, 2012 in Ed Tech 541

 

Spreadsheets, Databases, and You

A view from behind the teacher’s desk

Many of you may not be old enough to remember the days of manual attendance and grading, or having to go to the office to thumb your way through student files to find information on a particular student. Back in the day, grades were all calculated manually, and weighing grades was not for the faint of heart or mathematically challenged souls. Teachers had these cool gadgets similar to a slide rule that “calculated” percentages. Yip, those were the days….

So what may you ask does this have to do with advantages of spreadsheets and databases? Well, everything really! For the most part teachers use spreadsheets and databases on a daily basis, without even realizing it. The electronic student management systems that the vast majority of schools now use are basically a user-friendly overlay on a spreadsheet or database. Using these applications doesn’t stop there. Spreadsheets can be used in many different ways to increase student understanding and engagement. The textbook for this class, Integrating Educational Technology Into Teaching, list many different advantages such as: demonstrating how the electoral college works, surveys, time-saving calculation abilities, graphical display of data, and what-if analysis (Roblyer & Doering, 2013). Spreadsheets aren’t limited to columns and rows of numbers. Spreadsheets cells can be formatted just like a word processing document; they can contain hyperlinks, images, SmartArt, graphs, charts, and more. Spreadsheet applications are user-friendly, and can be used interactively with and by students. The best thing about a spreadsheet – it can calculate a formula, while updating the related graph or chart, as quick as you can press enter.

A database is an information powerhouse. The purpose of this application is to store related information in a searchable format. A database can be a bit of a chameleon; it often takes the look of a form, but may also have the view of a spreadsheet. Databases in the educational setting aren’t limited to student management systems. They can be quite helpful in data collection and analysis, surveys, computer-based testing, and generating reports (Roblyer & Doering, 2013). Many prefer using a spreadsheet over a database, because creating a database can be a bit intimidating; but it doesn’t need to be. If you have information that you may want to sort, search, extract key data from, or generate a report from, then a database is your best solution.

Here is a simple example of a form created in Google Docs Spreadsheet.

Technically Google doesn’t have a database, but by using the form function, the spreadsheet application acts as a database. Often times, spreadsheets are used interchangeably with databases.

Resources:

Roblyer, M. D., & Doering, A. H. (2013). Integrating educational technology into teaching. (6 ed., pp. 122-126, 152-154).

Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson

 

 
3 Comments

Posted by on October 7, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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