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Monthly Archives: November 2012

Obstacles and Solutions – How to Overcome

If you have been around very long, you have probably already heard a plethora of excuses why incorporating technology into the classroom is just too much to expect. I have found myself pointing out the reasons we don’t do more. My usual complaint is our network’s “walled garden” is more of a tiny pot for herbs than a vegetable garden! So, instead of whining “what can be done?” Here are some suggestions for the more common obstacles:

Obstacle Solution
I don’t know how to use it.
  • Learn by watching tutorials on YouTube or other sites
  • Look for professional development opportunities from organizations such as NCTE and ISTE.
  • Check your state’s education department for professional development or tutorials. In Arizona it is the IDEAL Portal
  • Use the tutorials within the application
  • Read the manual
  • Have someone teach you, either a co-worker or a student
The technology department doesn’t allow it.
  • Demonstrate the educational need for the resource with sound research!
  • Provide exemplars of how the technology will increase learning
  • Have students present to the power-that-be
  • Request access to specific sites instead of opening up an entire category
My students don’t know how to use the technology, and I can’t afford the time to teach it.
  • Team up with another teacher, like the computer applications teacher to do a joint project
  • Use tutorials to assist students who are not familiar with the application
  • Use peer-tutors as the experts to teach classmates
I have too much to do already and I don’t have time for more!
  • Use an appropriate combination of computer/non-computer application
  • Use it as a learning tool as opposed to a teaching tool
  • Using simulations, digital storytelling and virtual field trips are motivating alternatives to traditional lectures and pen and paper projects
  • Technology increases student engagement, making class time more productive

As Roblyer and Doering point out in Chapter 11, regardless of your teacher education program, it is a teacher’s professional obligation to learn the tools through ongoing education and professional development.

Resources:

Roblyer, M. D., & Doering, A. H. (2013). Integrating educational technology into teaching. (6 ed., pp. 264-393). Upper

Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

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4 Comments

Posted by on November 18, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

Tags:

Obstacles and Solutions – How to Overcome

If you have been around very long, you have probably already heard a plethora of excuses why incorporating technology into the classroom is just too much to expect. I have found myself pointing out the reasons we don’t do more. My usual complaint is our network’s “walled garden” is more of a tiny pot for herbs than a vegetable garden! So, instead of whining “what can be done?” Here are some suggestions for the more common obstacles:

Obstacle Solution
I don’t know how to use it.

  • Learn by watching tutorials on YouTube or other sites
  • Look for professional development opportunities from organizations such as NCTE and ISTE.
  • Check your state’s education department for professional development or tutorials. In Arizona it is the IDEAL Portal
  • Use the tutorials within the application
  • Read the manual
  • Have someone teach you, either a co-worker or a student

The technology department doesn’t allow it.

  • Demonstrate the educational need for the resource with sound research!
  • Provide exemplars of how the technology will increase learning
  • Have students present to the power-that-be
  • Request access to specific sites instead of opening up an entire category

My students don’t know how to use the technology, and I can’t afford the time to teach it.

  • Team up with another teacher, like the computer applications teacher to do a joint project
  • Use tutorials to assist students who are not familiar with the application
  • Use peer-tutors as the experts to teach classmates

I have too much to do already and I don’t have time for more!

  • Use an appropriate combination of computer/non-computer application
  • Use it as a learning tool as opposed to a teaching tool
  • Using simulations, digital storytelling and virtual field trips are motivating alternatives to traditional lectures and pen and paper projects
  • Technology increases student engagement, making class time more productive

As Roblyer and Doering point out in Chapter 11, regardless of your teacher education program, it is a teacher’s professional obligation to learn the tools through ongoing education and professional development.

Resources:

Roblyer, M. D., & Doering, A. H. (2013). Integrating educational technology into teaching. (6 ed., pp. 264-393). Upper

Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

 
4 Comments

Posted by on November 18, 2012 in Ed Tech 541

 

Relative Advantages of Using Technology in Language Arts and Social Studies

The Common Core, high stakes testing, and AYP, these terms may make many a teacher shiver. With the push to deliver more content, and increase depth of knowledge why add on technology? The students sitting in our classrooms are digital natives – meaning technology has always been a part of their lives. These students are used to using interactive media in their personal lives. Traditional stand and deliver instruction will not get the students to where they need to be.  Lets take a look at the advantages of incorporating technology into the just two of core content areas, and how Internet and communications technology can help teachers:

Content Area  Advantage Technology

 English/

Language Arts

  • Increased literacy skills; digital, information, and in reading and writing skills.
  • Motivating students to read and write more
  • Word fluency and vocabulary development
  • Comprehension development
  • Feedback loop
  • Realia (definition: objects or activities used to relate classroom teaching to the real life)
Literacy: Blogs, Wikis, Podcast, e-mail, e-readers, and digital storytellingMotivation: word processors, blogsFluency: Online word matching and vocabulary buildersComprehension: Ebooks, interactive stories, digital storytellingFeedback: word processors, drill & practice, simulations, or educational gamesRealia: Digital publishing, podcast, ebooks, images, etc.
 Social Studies
  • Primary sources – artifacts, eye-witness accounts, journals, pictures, videos, etc.
  • Virtual field trips – take field trips without leaving the classroom
  • Mapping
  • Simulations
Primary sources: National Archivesdatabase access to images of documents, artifacts, and recordings. Other sites such as the BBC, museums, and state historical sites have many primary sources to interest students.Virtual field trips: Tours and Trips using the internet or Skype conversationsMapping: Google earth, Google maps, Esri Mapping applicationSimulations: Oregon Trail or Argument Wars

For more information check out these resources:

Types of Feedback and Their Purpose

Education through Exploration – The JASON Project

Education Database Online – Virtual Field Trips

The Connected Classroom – a list of simulations for a variety of content areas

Social Studies Freeware

Credits:

Dunkel Chilcott, M. J. (n.d.). Effective use of simulations in the classroom. Catalina Foothills School District System

Dynamics Project. Retrieved from http://clexchange.org/ftp/documents/Implementation/IM1996-01Effective

UseOfSims.pdf

Focus on effectiveness researched-based strategies. (2005). Retrieved from http://www.netc.org/focus/strategies/

prov.php

Roblyer, M. D., & Doering, A. H. (2013). Teaching and learning with technology in English and language arts instruction.

In Integrating educational technology into teaching. (6 ed., pp. 264-283). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Roblyer, M. D., & Doering, A. H. (2013). Teaching and learning with technology in social studies instruction. In Integrating

educational technology into teaching. (6 ed., pp. 330-349). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

The JASON project. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.jasonproject.org/

The teacher’s guide. (2012, March 22). Retrieved from http://www.theteachersguide.com/virtualtours.html

The teacher’s ultimate destination for virtual field trips. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.onlineeducation.net/resources/

virtual-field-trips

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 11, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

Tags:

Relative Advantages of Using Technology in Language Arts and Social Studies

The Common Core, high stakes testing, and AYP, these terms may make many a teacher shiver. With the push to deliver more content, and increase depth of knowledge why add on technology? The students sitting in our classrooms are digital natives – meaning technology has always been a part of their lives. These students are used to using interactive media in their personal lives. Traditional stand and deliver instruction will not get the students to where they need to be.  Lets take a look at the advantages of incorporating technology into the just two of core content areas, and how Internet and communications technology can help teachers:

Content Area  Advantage Technology

 English/

Language Arts

  • Increased literacy skills; digital, information, and in reading and writing skills.
  • Motivating students to read and write more
  • Word fluency and vocabulary development
  • Comprehension development
  • Feedback loop
  • Realia (definition: objects or activities used to relate classroom teaching to the real life)

Literacy: Blogs, Wikis, Podcast, e-mail, e-readers, and digital storytellingMotivation: word processors, blogsFluency: Online word matching and vocabulary buildersComprehension: Ebooks, interactive stories, digital storytellingFeedback: word processors, drill & practice, simulations, or educational gamesRealia: Digital publishing, podcast, ebooks, images, etc.
 Social Studies

  • Primary sources – artifacts, eye-witness accounts, journals, pictures, videos, etc.
  • Virtual field trips – take field trips without leaving the classroom
  • Mapping
  • Simulations

Primary sources: National Archivesdatabase access to images of documents, artifacts, and recordings. Other sites such as the BBC, museums, and state historical sites have many primary sources to interest students.Virtual field trips: Tours and Trips using the internet or Skype conversationsMapping: Google earth, Google maps, Esri Mapping applicationSimulations: Oregon Trail or Argument Wars

For more information check out these resources:

Types of Feedback and Their Purpose

Education through Exploration – The JASON Project

Education Database Online – Virtual Field Trips

The Connected Classroom – a list of simulations for a variety of content areas

Social Studies Freeware

Credits:

Dunkel Chilcott, M. J. (n.d.). Effective use of simulations in the classroom. Catalina Foothills School District System

Dynamics Project. Retrieved from http://clexchange.org/ftp/documents/Implementation/IM1996-01Effective

UseOfSims.pdf

Focus on effectiveness researched-based strategies. (2005). Retrieved from http://www.netc.org/focus/strategies/

prov.php

Roblyer, M. D., & Doering, A. H. (2013). Teaching and learning with technology in English and language arts instruction.

In Integrating educational technology into teaching. (6 ed., pp. 264-283). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Roblyer, M. D., & Doering, A. H. (2013). Teaching and learning with technology in social studies instruction. In Integrating

educational technology into teaching. (6 ed., pp. 330-349). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

The JASON project. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.jasonproject.org/

The teacher’s guide. (2012, March 22). Retrieved from http://www.theteachersguide.com/virtualtours.html

The teacher’s ultimate destination for virtual field trips. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.onlineeducation.net/resources/

virtual-field-trips

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 11, 2012 in Ed Tech 541